Phenolic Compounds as the Source of Allergic Response

– by Dr. Eric Herman, D.C. BioVeda Health & Wellness Center of Bethlehem What causes allergies and chemical sensitivities? Over the last decade, important breakthroughs have occurred in the identification and treatment of allergies. Dr. Robert Gardner, Ph.D. professor of nutrition at Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah), discovered that specific key chemical agents cause allergic reactions including hayfever. These naturally occurring chemical agents called “phenolic” (aromatic) compounds, are regularly found throughout our environment in thousands of items including most foods, pollen and chemicals. What is the relationship between allergies and asthma? Many forms of asthma are caused by allergic reactions from both airborne phenolic compounds and those found in foods. Asthmatic individuals can be helped in the same way as others suffering from allergies. Airborne phenolic compounds are often found in pollen, tobacco smoke, house dust, air pollution, kapok, wool, feathers, animal hair or dander, building materials, furniture stuffing, cottonseed, and chemical odors. Some examples of foods that are most likely to be factors associated with asthma are those eaten daily such as wheat, eggs, chocolate, corn, peanut butter, citrus fruits, potatoes and tomatoes. We have helped many people suffering from asthma by first testing for those phenolics and other agents that can cause or contribute to asthma. We then screen and treat allergies, if indicated, utilizing our clinics’ painless techniques. This treatment also helps strengthen the immune system. Do I have to restrict my diet to avoid allergies? Not usually. Since phenolics are found in so many foods and other materials, it would be virtually impossible through dietary restrictions to avoid the phenolics causing the reactions. For instance,...

Top Health News: Allergy Bullies, Organic Food and Top 10 Toxins

Several articles came to our attention this week as must reads when it comes to a natural approach to overall health and wellness.  Here’s the latest in health news across the web! Food Allergies Make Kids a Target (CNN.com) More children with food allergies may experience acts of bullying and other targeted negative behaviors than their peers, Sicherer said. A 2001 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development study found that about 17 percent of children in grades six to 10 reported being bullied. By comparison, 50 percent of kids in that age group in the food allergy study were reported to have experienced bullying, teasing or harassment. Read more. Top Ten Toxins and How to Protect Your Family (USA Today) What can you do to protect your family from everyday toxins? Plenty, writes USA TODAY health reporter Liz Szabo, in Fresh: Women’s Health Guide, a new USA TODAY publication that hits newsstands today. Here’s Szabo’s list of the toxic 10, in no particular order, with ideas for avoiding them. Read more. What’s Wrong with Our Food “System”? (TedX Next Generation) Why go organic?  11 year old, Birke Baehr speaks out about the risks of genetically modified foods, CAFOs, synthetic pesticides and fertilizers, and food irradiation. Watch the video. Hot Pepper for High Blood Pressure (Dr. Andrew Weil) Capsaicin, the compound that adds the spicy zing to hot peppers, seems to have some benefit in blood pressure control. Chinese researchers have reported that long term consumption of capsaicin as part of the normal diet of rats bred to have high blood pressure helps relax blood vessels so that pressure falls. Read...

Food Intolerance vs Food Sensitivity and How Digestive Enzymes Can Help

– By Dr. James Augustine, D.C. Myth: Food intolerance and food sensitivity are the same thing. Not true. And neither one are the same as food allergy. Experts say “food intolerance” and “food sensitivity” are often used interchangeably by the public, causing misunderstanding. Add “food poisoning” to the list, and people become even more confused. Food intolerance occurs when the body lacks a particular enzyme to digest that food. Two common examples are lactose intolerance and celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder in which the gastrointestinal tract cannot process gluten, a protein in wheat-based products such as cereal and bread. An intolerant person avoids the foods that trigger a reaction, but these reactions aren’t caused by the immune system and they are not life threatening. Food sensitivity, an understudied area, generally means people have an unpleasant reaction to certain foods; perhaps they develop acid reflux, nausea, or abdominal cramps, but again, these are not immune system reactions, and these reactions do not always occur in the same way when eating the food. You could also have a bad reaction to food tainted by bacterial contamination or not properly prepared. That’s food poisoning. Symptoms often involve diarrhea and vomiting and typically clear up in 24-48 hours. Dr. Augustine’s comments: Good clarification here. Another vote for taking digestive enzymes, which clears up acid reflux and most other issues with food intolerances, as well as can prevent tainted food issues. A Note from BioVeda: BioVeda Health & Wellness Centers offer a digestive enzymes supplement product called “HealthZymes” which are advanced digestive enzymes. Maybe you are having occasional problems with your digestive system, you...

Are Food Allergies on the Rise?

A recent report from Children’s Hospital Boston indicates that food allergies in children are becoming more common and more severe.  In fact, the number of food allergy cases at this hospital doubled in 2006. In addition, the number of kids with food allergies went up 18 percent from 1997 to 2007, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 3 million children younger than 18 had a food or digestive allergy in 2007, the CDC said.  There are many theories as to why more and more children are becoming allergic.  This rise in allergies could be due to our Western diet, making us more susceptible to developing allergies and other illnesses. CNN further explores this possibility in their article “Why are food allergies on the rise?“: The children in the African village live in a community that produces its own food. The study authors say this is closer to how humans ate 10,000 years ago. Their diet is mostly vegetarian. By contrast, the local diet of European children contains more sugar, animal fat and calorie-dense foods. The study authors posit that these factors result in less biodiversity in the organisms found inside the gut of European children. The decrease in richness of gut bacteria in Westerners may have something to do with the rise in allergies in industrialized countries, said Dr. Paolo Lionetti of the department of pediatrics at Meyer Children Hospital at the University of Florence. Sanitation measures and vaccines in the West may have controlled infectious disease, but they decreased exposure to a variety of bacteria may have opened the door to these other...

Did you know? Two types of food allergies – IgE versus IgG

By Dr. Jack Epter – Natural Health Allergies, Chiropractic, and Nutrition IgE is an indication of a hypersensitivity or true allergy. IgG is a secondary response usually associated with a previous exposure to an antigen. IgE Food Allergies The best known and well-studied form of food allergies is called a Type 1 immune reaction (classical food allergy, immediate-onset, IgE-mediated, atopic food allergies, etc.). Type 1 food allergies occur in approximately only 2-5% of the population. Type 1 food allergies occur mostly in children and are less frequent in adults. Usually occurring in the genetically predisposed individual, the immune system begins creating a specific type of antibody called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) to certain foods. One side of the IgE antibody will recognize and bind to the allergic food. The other side of the antibody is attached to a specialized immune cell packed with histamine, called a Mast cell. Primed for action, the IgE antibody now only has to patiently wait for re-exposure to food allergens. When you eat the allergic food the next time, IgE antibodies hungrily latch onto the food. Instantaneously histamine and other allergy-related chemicals (chemical mediators) are released from the mast cell, quickly bringing on the unwelcome appearance of stomach cramping, diarrhea, skin rashes, hives, swelling, wheezing or the most dreaded of all Type 1 reactions, anaphylaxis. IgG Delayed Onset Food Allergy Type 3 immune reactions are much more commonly involved in food allergy than Type 1 reactions. In fact, 45-60% of the population has been reported as having delayed food allergies. Delayed food allergy or food sensitivity also involves the immune system. They occur when your...

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