Allergy-Free Thanksgiving Feast

Hosting Thanksgiving dinner can be stressful for anyone.  Add food allergies to the mix, and it can become overwhelming. This year my family is hosting an allergy-free Thanksgiving for my brother, his wife and two girls, one of whom is allergic to many common foods and food additives. I’m already limited by my own son’s food sensitivities, which include mild orange and oat allergies. Add my niece to the table, and we can have no soy, no food coloring, no beef, no tomatoes….I could go on. I want my niece to feel welcome so I’ll limit the spices on the turkey (she’s allergic to pepper) and use whole, fresh foods throughout the allergy-free meal. I love to make homemade macaroni and cheese at Thanksgiving and Christmas, but this year I’ll be looking for a recipe that uses only white cheeses since cheddar contains food coloring. We’ll splurge on clear soda (minimal food coloring) and homemade whipped cream (no preservatives) for the soy free pumpkin pie I found here. With food allergies becoming more prevalent in our society, there is a wealth of allergy and gluten-free recipes to be found on the web. For allergy-free lunches and snacks, we stick to soy-free deli meats and white cheeses for easy meat and cheese roll ups. Every time my niece visits, I make sure to have all natural potato chips, fresh fruit, and a vegetable tray with homemade dip on hand for easy snacking. Any extra preparation I have to do is more than worth the time I spend with my brother and his family! And her parents deserve to know there...

Food Allergies – What Can You Do?

Dr. David Conner, D.C.  writes on his BioVeda of Vacaville, CA blog: You eat strawberries. Hives. You eat shellfish. Your throat starts to close and you can’t breathe. You eat nuts. Your lips and tongue start to swell. You obviously are suffering from food allergies. Is there anything can you do to prevent them? Food allergies are the result of the immune system’s inability to detect what is healthy and what is not in the food that you eat. It may see that strawberry as an invader of sorts, so it launches an all-out attack to get rid of the invader, or allergen. To do this, the immune system produces proteins, called antibodies, against the invader. These antibodies can then recognize the alien invader (strawberry) if it enters your body again. Your body also responds to allergens by producing histamines; these histamines produce the allergic reaction to the food source in the form of a runny nose, hives, rashes, inflammation or swelling, difficulty breathing, and at its worst – anaphylaxis, a severe reaction that leads to difficulty breathing, a sharp decrease in blood pressure and unconsciousness. Food allergies can also produce conditions such as ADD/ADHD, irritability, stomach and digestive system problems, migraines, arthritis, depression, seizures, irritable or inflammatory bowel diseases, colds and ear infections. Obviously if you’ve had a bad reaction after eating a certain food, it would be best to stay away from it in the future. Some people have tried eliminating whole groups of food from their diets (i.e., dairy, gluten, grains, nuts, etc.) when it is difficult to pinpoint one cause. Since allergies are the result...

Latex Allergy and Food by Dr. Eric Herman BioVeda of Bethlehem

Dr. Eric Herman with BioVeda of Bethlehem in the Philadelphia area, recently posted an article to his BioVeda blog regarding Latex Allergy and Food: Latex allergic people may experience allergic symptoms when they eat certain fruits, vegetables and nuts. Latex is extracted from the sap from the gum tree, Hevea brasiliensis. Latex especially is used to produce rubber gloves and catheters. Balloons and condoms also are produced from latex. Some people are allergic towards latex. Proteins remaining in the latex products after curing the rubber cause the allergic reaction. The symptoms of latex allergy after skin contact are typically immediate redness and swelling. Cross-reactions may occur between the residual parts of plant proteins in the latex rubber and proteins in foods just like cross-reactions between pollen and foods. The most commonly reported cross-reactive foods include banana, avocado, kiwi, and chestnut together with papaya, fig, potato, and tomato. Around 30-80% of people with latex allergy experience symptoms when they eat one or more of these foods. These stress responses may be reduced or even eliminated using BAX 3000 Therapy.   Contact a doctor in your area...

~Results may vary from patient to patient. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These statements and products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If pregnant or nursing, ask a health professional before use. If symptoms persist or worsen, seek advice of physician.