Early Supplementation of Vitamin D and Calcium Shown to Reduce Osteoporosis Risk

A clinical study conducted at the School of Exercise Science at Australian Catholic University has shown that taking high quality calcium plus vitamin D significantly improved bone density, mass and strength in girls ages nine to 13- exactly what experts want to achieve in that time of life to prevent future skeletal issues. “Experts regard osteoporosis as a pediatric disease because the best time to prevent is during childhood and early adolescence,” says Dr. Tim Wood, Executive Vice President of Research and Development at USANA Health Sciences, Inc. “Women put on 50% of their adult bone mineral mass during their teenage years. As such, this is the best time to grow strong, mineral rich bones and the most effective way to prevent osteoporosis later in life.” Risks of Osteoporosis Increase IF: You have a family history of osteoporosis You have a poor diet You have a sedentary lifestyle You are a white female You are small boned, with thin body frame You are a smoker You take medications such as cortisone, thyroid hormone and some depression medications The National Osteoporosis Foundation tells us that we need more milk as a source of calcium to build strong bones, yet scientific evidence does not support this. Americans have the among the highest osteoporosis rates worldwide, while our dairy intake is also among the highest. A 1997 study indicated that of 78,000 nurses, those who drank more than one glass of milk per day had a 45% greater chance of hip fractures (American Journal of Public Health, 1997). Boron Copper, Magnesium, Manganese, Zinc, Vitamin C and proper fluoride levels are just as...

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